PlayStation 5 (PS5) Details: New CPU, New GPU, Backwards Compatability, SSD Hard Drive, 8K

Some details on the next generation of Sony Playstation have hit the internet, and they are quite intriguing. A lot of players have been worried that there old games will be obsolete, but that's looking like it will not be the case. According to the Wired interview, the new PS5 will be partially based on the PS4's architecture, which means there will be backwards compatability. The new system will also be getting a new CPU, GPU, and will be running an SSD hard drive that should make things run and load much faster!

Information about the new AMD Chip and GPU:

PlayStation’s next-generation console ticks all those boxes, starting with an AMD chip at the heart of the device. (Warning: some alphabet soup follows.) The CPU is based on the third generation of AMD’s Ryzen line and contains eight cores of the company’s new 7nm Zen 2 microarchitecture. The GPU, a custom variant of Radeon’s Navi family, will support ray tracing, a technique that models the travel of light to simulate complex interactions in 3D environments. While ray tracing is a staple of Hollywood visual effects and is beginning to worm its way into high-end processors and Nvidia's recently announced RTX line, no game console has been able to manage it. Yet.

If you are a VR fan then your PSVR will still be compataible with the new system:

One of the words Cerny uses to describe the audio may be a familiar to those who follow virtual reality: presence, that feeling of existing inside a simulated environment. When he mentions it, I ask him about PlayStation VR, the peripheral system that has sold more than 4 million units since its 2016 release. Specifically, I ask if there will be a next-gen PSVR to go alongside this next console. “I won't go into the details of our VR strategy today,” he says, “beyond saying that VR is very important to us and that the current PSVR headset is compatible with the new console.”

Information about the speed of the new SSD:

To demonstrate, Cerny fires up a PS4 Pro playing Spider-Man, a 2018 PS4 exclusive that he worked on alongside Insomniac Games. (He’s not just an systems architect; Cerny created arcade classic Marble Madness when he was all of 19 and was heavily involved with PlayStation and PS2 franchises like Crash Bandicoot, Spyro the Dragon, and Ratchet and Clank.) On the TV, Spidey stands in a small plaza. Cerny presses a button on the controller, initiating a fast-travel interstitial screen. When Spidey reappears in a totally different spot in Manhattan, 15 seconds have elapsed. Then Cerny does the same thing on a next-gen devkit connected to a different TV. (The devkit, an early “low-speed” version, is concealed in a big silver tower, with no visible componentry.) What took 15 seconds now takes less than one: 0.8 seconds, to be exact.

Check out the full interview on Wired.

Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to get updates on your favorite games!

About the Author

Shaun aka Evident is a lifelong gamer and creator of websites. He mostly focuses on shooters, but has been known to dabble in the occasional card game as well. You can find him binge watching TV shows in his downtime.

Leave a Comment

Comments are on moderation and will be approved in a timely manner. All comments must be on topic and add something of substance to the post. If your nickname or comment is inappropriate it will be removed.

Please do not beg or ask for anything free, your comment will be deleted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.